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Astronauts on board the International Space Station (ISS) have to do just about everything for themselves. Living within this constantly orbiting laboratory, they’re not only crew members, they’re also plumbers, janitors and housekeepers. Just last week, in fact, the team of six astronauts currently on board began a month-long chore that requires taking their trash
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July was likely the hottest month in recorded history, according to new data from the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) released last Thursday. According to the report, findings from the Copernicus Climate Change Program indicate that temperatures recorded in the first 29 days of July were as hot or marginally hotter than the previous record month,
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Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk announced via a tweet on Saturday that he would be launching The Boring Company China, the first international extension of his infrastructure and tunnelling construction company, in late August while in Shanghai for the second World Artificial Intelligence Conference. In another tweet, the founder and CEO of The Boring Company confirmed that it would
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Astrobiologists have sent 18 different strains of bacteria up to the International Space Station. They’re not meant to contaminate the already-kinda-gross orbital research center, but rather to determine whether the mineral-leaching microbes could help astronauts mine space rocks during future missions, Space.com reports. If the so-called BioRock experiment pans out, the researchers behind the experiment
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The most comprehensive and widely-held theory of how the Moon formed is called the ‘giant impact hypothesis.’ That hypothesis states that about 150 million years after the Solar System formed, a roughly Mars-sized planet named Theia collided with Earth. Though the timeline is hotly-debated in the scientific community, we know that this collision melted Theia
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To many, ancient Egypt is synonymous with the pharaohs and pyramids of the Dynastic period starting about 3,100BC. Yet long before that, about 9,300-4,000BC, enigmatic Neolithic peoples flourished. Indeed, it was the lifestyles and cultural innovations of these peoples that provided the very foundation for the advanced civilisations to come. But who were they? As
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Not every volcanic eruption is a Mount Vesuvius-like catastrophe, with rivers of fire and flying rock that rains down on unsuspecting Pompeiians. Sometimes, volcanoes’ summits collapse, forming miles-wide depressions called calderas, which are peppered by eruptive vents. When rivulets of magma force their way out of these vents, those small eruptions can spew dangerous amounts
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Scientists have just discovered something new about gold. When extreme crushing pressure is applied quickly, over mere nanoseconds, the element’s atomic structure changes, becoming more similar to metals harder than gold. It’s the first time this structural state has ever been observed in gold, suggesting properties that could help scientists refine their understanding of how
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Researchers have developed artificial cells that can respond to external chemical forces, just like real ones do. This exciting step could get us closer to using synthetic biological structures in real-world situations, such as targeted drug delivery or cleaning up pollution. In this proof-of-principle study, scientists have succeeded in getting artificial cells to glow with
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Indian tiger numbers are up, according to one of the most detailed wildlife surveys ever conducted. Tiger populations have risen by 6 percent, to roughly 3,000 animals. The massive survey may set a new world standard in counting large carnivores. The encouraging results validate India’s impressive investments in tiger conservation. A mammoth effort Large, solitary