Month: June 2022

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For the first time, scientists have found the building blocks for life on an asteroid in space.  Japanese researchers have discovered more than 20 amino acids on the space rock Ryugu, which is more than 200 million miles (320 million kilometers) from Earth. Scientists made the first-of-its-kind detection by studying samples retrieved from the near-Earth asteroid by
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Scientists have published a map showing the Southern Ocean floor in unprecedented detail. The new images, generated from sonar data that took years to collect, show canyons, ridges, and mountains deep under the water. The map was published in the peer-reviewed journal Scientific Data on Tuesday. It is part of the Nippon Foundation General Bathymetric Chart of the Oceans
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Astronomers have discovered two large, mysterious objects blasting out of the brightest black hole in the known Universe. Discovered in a 1959 survey of cosmic radio-wave sources, the supermassive black hole 3C 273 is a quasar – short for “quasi-stellar object”, because the light emitted by these behemoths is bright enough to be mistaken for starlight. While black holes
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The Siberian tundra could disappear by the year 2500, unless greenhouse gas emissions are dramatically reduced.  Even in the best-case scenarios, two-thirds of this landscape – defined by its short growing season and cover of grasses, moss, shrubs and lichens – could vanish, leaving behind two fragments separated by 1,553 miles (2,500 kilometers), scientists recently predicted. And
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There’s no question that young solar systems are chaotic places. Cascading collisions defined our young Solar System as rocks, boulders, and planetesimals repeatedly collided. A new study based on chunks of asteroids that crashed into Earth puts a timeline to some of that chaos. Astronomers know that asteroids have remained essentially unchanged since their formation
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In light of the brutal tug-of-war over resources that is natural selection, it’s been taken for granted that the giraffe’s iconic neck evolved to reach leaves other plant-eaters can’t possibly access. What seemed obvious to Charles Darwin has since attracted a great deal of scrutiny, with some biologists proposing those extended vertebrae aren’t for browsing,
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The world’s favorite herbicide is making it harder for buff-tailed bumblebees to keep their hives warm enough to incubate larvae, new research finds.  Bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) face food shortages due to habitat loss and the widespread monocultures of agricultural crops. Like honeybees, they feed on nectar collected from plants, and store more of it in