Nature

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Small really does seem to be beautiful in evolutionary terms. The largest dinosaurs, pterosaurs and mammals may look impressive but these giants are vastly outnumbered by microscopic bacteria and single-celled algae and fungi. Small organisms are also ancient and incredibly resilient. The first evidence of single-cell organisms dates from around 3.8 billion years ago, soon
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The presence of parasitic microbes has for the first time been found literally altering the metabolism of their hosts. The culprits are tiny, parasitic archaea of the species Candidatus Nanohaloarchaeum antarcticus that parasitize other single-celled organisms, the host archaeon species Halorubrum lacusprofundi. And researchers have found that these parasites are very selective about the resources
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The absolutely incredible discovery of several fully articulated shark fossils from the Late Cretaceous, 105 to 72 million years ago, is shedding some much-needed light on the mysterious shark family tree. In the Lagerstätte fossil beds of Vallecillo in Mexico, paleontologists have made the find of a lifetime: several exceptionally well preserved fossils of an
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Bumblebees can surprisingly withstand days underwater, according to a study published Wednesday, suggesting they could withstand increased floods brought on by climate change that threaten their winter hibernation burrows. The survival of these pollinators that are crucial to ecosystems is “encouraging” amid worrying global trends of their declining populations, the study’s lead author Sabrina Rondeau
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Tardigrades are possibly the most indestructible animal on Earth. These microscopic little beasties can take almost anything humans throw at them, and waddle away perfectly intact on their eight stubby little legs. The strategies behind these feats of superheroic survival are multiple, from a damage suppressor protein that literally protects their DNA, to a dehydrated,
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Scientists have discovered a species of marine algae that contains an organelle capable of harvesting nitrogen from the atmosphere – an ability previously thought to be the exclusive domain of certain symbiotic bacteria. The international team of researchers behind the discovery believe the algae’s talent originated from an endosymbiotic relationship, where a nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium was