Nature

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Once containing a vast, prehistoric ocean, the Nullarbor Plain in southern Australia is an extraordinary landscape. Now a scrubby desert on limestone bedrock, it’s extremely flat and almost featureless, extending for over a thousand kilometers. But a new discovery suggests that the vast, semi-arid expanse may not be as featureless as we thought. Using satellite
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Insects have their own suite of friendly microbes that help keep them healthy, just as we do. But instead of simply growing larger like us sensible vertebrates, insects undergo extreme body warping to metamorphosize into their older stages of life. As you might expect, these life-changing contortions complicate the microbes’ living arrangements. This convoluted process
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A new study has discovered a ‘frat-boy culture’ in dolphin society to rival our own. Beyond humans, researchers say dolphins are the only species known to form such complex, cooperative ‘bromances’. Other animals, like chimpanzees, show fierce male rivalry in their bid to mate with females. Their interactions don’t end in cooperation but in violence.
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Migratory insects number in the trillions. They’re a major part of global ecosystems, helping to transport nutrients and pollen across continents – and often traveling thousands of kilometers in the process. It had long been thought migrating insects largely go wherever the wind blows. But there’s mounting evidence they’re actually great navigators and can select
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Fossils of a small, prickly dinosaur recently discovered in South America may represent an entire lineage of armored dinosaurs previously unknown to science. The newly discovered species, Jakapil kaniukura, looks like a primitive relative of armored dinosaurs like Ankylosaurus or Stegosaurus, but it came from the Cretaceous, the last era of the dinosaurs, and lived
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In a fascinating discovery, western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) at Zoo Atlanta have been caught summoning their keepers using a strange cough-sneeze hybrid. Only two other species have displayed this ability to create new vocalizations to attract our attention: zoo-housed chimpanzees and orangutans. Now, we can add gorillas to that list. Below, 24-year-old female