Month: September 2023

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Science is hard. The science of consciousness is particularly hard, beset with philosophical difficulties and a scarcity of experimental data. So in June, when the results of a head-to-head experimental contest between two rival theories were announced at the 26th annual meeting of the Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness in New York City,
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To capture the first image of a black hole, researchers had to build a telescope as big as Earth by stitching together data from observatories around the globe. When the fuzzy, glowing image was finally released in 2019, every major newspaper ran it. Now, that same supermassive monster – which sits at the center of
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As far as gravity is concerned, both matter and its charge-flipped ‘mirror’ twin, antimatter, deserve a big, warm hug. A recent experiment by international Antihydrogen Laser Physics Apparatus (ALPHA) collaboration achieved the first direct measurement of free-falling antimatter. Had the results been any different, we might have at last had our first solid clue on
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The ghost, at long last, is actually in the machine. Earlier this year, for the first time, scientists detected neutrinos created in a particle collider. Those abundant yet enigmatic subatomic particles are so removed from the rest of matter that they slide through it like specters, earning them the nickname “ghost particles”. The researchers said
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In 1960, Freeman Dyson proposed how advanced civilizations could create megastructures that enclosed their system, allowing them to harness all of their star’s energy and multiplying the habitable space they could occupy. In 2015, the astronomical community was intrigued when the star KIC 8462852 (aka. Tabby’s Star) began to dim inexplicably. While an analysis of
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A new species of tarantula found scurrying around the forests of Thailand shimmers with dazzling blue highlights. Its discoverers have named the beastie Chilobrachys natanicharum, and say it’s the first tarantula ever identified living in Thailand’s mangroves. Findings like these highlight the value of preserving these natural habitats, where unique species have carved out small
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The Vikings were notorious raiders, but they were traders too, establishing vast trade routes that flourished from the 8th to 11th centuries. A new study reveals some of those connections spanned surprisingly long distances, linking large urban trading centers with rural outlands where many natural resources originated. Researchers from the UK and Europe illustrate the
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Well, they’ve done it. After seven years and 6.21 billion-kilometers, NASA’s OSIRIS-REx has officially delivered a capsule of precious Asteroid Bennu dust to Earth. It’s a major, incredible achievement, a feat of space prowess, engineering, dedication, and skill. But although the capsule has reached its destination – Earth – there’s now a lot more work
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Carbon dioxide detected on Jupiter‘s moon Europa comes from the vast ocean beneath its icy shell, research using James Webb Space Telescope data indicated on Thursday, potentially bolstering hopes the hidden water could harbour life. Scientists are confident there is a huge ocean of saltwater kilometers below Europa’s ice-covered surface, making the moon a prime
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Wi-Fi signals can do much more than deliver streaming movies and music around the home, it turns out: they can also be used to identify shapes through solid walls, as demonstrated in recent experiments. The ability for Wi-Fi to spot movement through walls has been shown off before, but the technology struggles with seeing anything
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In 1960, legendary physicist Freeman Dyson published his seminal paper “Search for Artificial Stellar Sources of Infrared Radiation,” wherein he proposed that there could be extraterrestrial civilizations so advanced that they could build megastructures large enough to enclose their parent star. He also indicated that these “Dyson Spheres,” as they came to be known, could