Month: December 2023

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In 1997, a deep belch echoed through the belly of Earth’s oceans. The super low-frequency sound came out like a sliding ‘bloooop’. For years, it remained the loudest unidentified noise ever recorded underwater. Scientists called it the Bloop. frameborder=”0″ allow=”accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture; web-share” allowfullscreen> Theories on where the eerie sound came from
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Arctic observers were granted a rare spectacle when rare rainbow-colored clouds streaked the skies ahead of the holiday season. A cold wave sweeping through the Arctic brought the rare polar stratospheric clouds within view for at least three days between December 18 and December 20, per the website spaceweather.com. Polar stratospheric cloud above Oslo, Norway.(Glenn
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A world-first, non-invasive AI system can turn silent thoughts into text while only requiring users to wear a snug-fitting cap. The Australian researchers who developed the technology, called DeWave, tested the process using data from more than two dozen subjects. Participants read silently while wearing a cap that recorded their brain waves via electroencephalogram (EEG)
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Archaeologists have linked rising and lowering sea levels in the Atlantic Ocean to the ebbs and flows of ancient civilizations in southern Brazil. The findings incorporated several lines of past archaeological evidence, and suggest even large, resilient, and cooperative coastal communities can easily go out with the tide. When analyzing and dating a series of
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For the first time, scientists have sequenced the genome of a mysterious species of giant bacterium that can be seen without a microscope. The discoveries about their reproductive strategies, survival mechanisms, and distinct metabolic mechanisms – similar to mitochondria – may one day be useful in developing sustainable energy technologies and increasing efficiency in agriculture.
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For much of the 65,000 years of Australia’s human history, the now-submerged northwest continental shelf connected the Kimberley and western Arnhem Land. This vast, habitable realm covered nearly 390,000 square kilometres, an area one-and-a-half times larger than New Zealand is today. It was likely a single cultural zone, with similarities in ground stone-axe technology, styles
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Strange variations across different measurements of the planet’s surface have revealed periodic oscillations deep in Earth’s heart. By studying minute changes in the length of Earth’s day and the motion of Earth’s poles, a team led by geoscientists Yachong An and Hao Ding of Wuhan University have determined that Earth’s inner core wobbles with a
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A Miocene-era shift from dense forests to open plains may have caused ancient hominids to move from vowel-based to consonant-based calls, a new study says. The UK researchers monitored acoustic properties of recorded orangutan calls, believed to resemble early human sounds, projected across an African savannah to study how the environment shaped our ancestors’ ability
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China’s third test mission of a reusable, robotic spacecraft continues to invite speculation by casting into orbit half a dozen small objects, tentatively referred to as ‘wingmen’ by intrigued amateur skywatchers. Dubbed Shenlong – Chinese for “divine dragon” – the experimental orbital plane was launched from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center on Thursday 14 December